Sep
09

Sucralose 2017

Still can't think of much to post about, but checking out the viewer stats shows that there really isn't much point. The visitor count tanked years ago when I neglected the site.

Anyway, today I'm going to post about the Sucralose sweetener as it may save people a lot of money.

Alright, a bit of background: I do zero carb. Originally I did a ketogenic (keto) diet but that shizz ain't good enough for a guy like me, so I now almost (almost!) exclusively eat meat and cheese. I don't need to be that strict - but I am. I plan on bodybuilding after this massive cut I'm through so I need to get this shit right.

I use sweeteners quite a lot and so I've been buying Stevia / Sucralose / Erythritol / Saccharin (delete as applicable). Except, the other day I got annoyed with how much Stevia sweetener I had to use as compared to previously.

Then, somehow, I stumbled upon 100% pure Sucralose. This is what manufacturers dilute (typically along with a sugar - which is idiotic considering the point of sweeteners in the first place!) to create the final product.

100% pure Sucralose is 600 times sweeter than sugar. It is completely insane how potent the stuff is when it hasn't been diluted down to near-uselessness (hello, homoeopathy!). I put literally 30 milligrams in a cup of tea; this pure powder here is a 100g pack. I bought two packs.

I'll still have a lot left over after the heat death of the universe...

[No: sweeteners aren't bad for you, you colossal idiot]

Sep
19

Hot Electrolytes Drink 2017

Here's a little electrolytes drink I've come up with to supplement sodium, potassium, and any other essential nutrients/chemicals that you may have the ingredients laying around for.

I won't get into the specifics of why I'm making or having this drink other than to mention the following for search engine purposes: zero carb, low carb, keto, ketogenic, LCHF. The listed eating regimes are diuretic in nature, so extra supplementation is required; the consumption of incidental salts is very low due to not eating processed foods. In fact, adults should aim for 5g - 6g of sodium chloride per day (table salt is only 50% chloride). Research is out there, if you're interested.

This recipe - if you want to even call it a recipe - isn't zero carbohydrates. It's extremely low, but it's not outright zero. You can make substitutions to remove the (already low) count if you prefer, by, say, substituting the cube for bone broth.

Ingredients

Preperation

Crumble the bouillon cube into a cup and fill it up with hot water. Add in a small-ish quantity of the rest of the ingredients, mix, and taste.

If you can handle more of the salts, add more of them in. Mix, again, and taste. Keep doing this until you determine how much of the ingredients you can have without it being too salty.

The aim is to get as many of the electrolytes in as possible while keeping it palatable. The more there is, the better.

I use vinegar and Worcestershire sauce to give it a much stronger flavour; I love acidity, so both of these work brilliantly. I specifically chose Henderson's Relish as its carb count (7g per 100g/ml) is much lower than, say, Lea and Perrins which is way higher at 21g. Sainsbury's own brand is 30g! Hell naw, son.

You can add calcium and such, but they float in the liquid and so aren't fun to consume. Horrible and bitter; better off taking it in tablet form if you require supplementation.

Don't forget: If you're doing zero or low carb, or ketogenic, your mineral and vitamin requirements are greatly reduced. No competing with glucose for cellular uptake or any of that crap. Do note that vegetables will interfere with absorption, so zero carb has even lower requirements than the other LCHF diets.

Supplement Vitamin D3 and K2. Everyone should.